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Mick Jagger Upset with Ex-Rolling Stones Financial Adviser over New Memoir

Image courtesy of MickJagger.com (via ABC News Radio)
Image courtesy of MickJagger.com (via ABC News Radio)

Rolling Stones singer Mick Jagger apparently is fuming about a new book written by the band's former financial adviser Prince Rupert Loewenstein .  In A Prince Among Stones , which is scheduled to be published in the U.S. on March 5, the German aristocrat recounts a variety of details of his nearly 40-year association with the legendary British rockers.

"Call me old fashioned, but I don't think your ex-bank manager should be discussing your financial dealings and personal information in public," Jagger complained in a recent interview with U.K. newspaper The Mail on Sunday .  "It just goes to show that well-brought-up people don't always display good manners."

According to The Mail on Sunday , Loewenstein, who worked from the band from 1968 to 2007, reveals how he was hired by The Rolling Stones after a meeting with Jagger over his concerns that his band, though massively popular, was not making any money.  In the memoir, the author admits that he was never a fan of The Stones' music, while suggesting that because of this, he was able to serve them more effectively.  He wrote, "I feel that precisely because I was not a fan…I was able to view the band and what they produced calmly, dispassionately, maybe even clinically -- though never without affection."

While at times critical of the lifestyles of Jagger and guitarist Keith Richards , Loewenstein also praised both in his book.

"After the first two or three business meetings with Mick, I realized there was something exceptional in his makeup," wrote the Prince, "that his personality was able to convert his trade as itinerant performer into something far more intriguing."

As for Richards, Loewenstein admitted that he was "as impressed by [him] as I had been with Mick, though in a completely different way.  I saw that Keith was -- and I hesitate to say this -- the most intelligent mind of the band."

Among the aspects of The Stones' history covered by Loewenstein include his suggestion that the band mates leave the U.K. during the early 1970s for tax reasons, his efforts to help extricate the rockers' from their restrictive record contract with Allen Klein and his unsuccessful attempts to curb the scalping of the group's concert tickets.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

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